Thursday, April 30, 2009

About The Portfolio

I have said before that my photographs are a projection of me. What I have created through my lens came from my eye and my mind. They are my extension. How I display these images is then very important. I spend as much time working with my images on the computer, editing, organizing, and uploading them, as I do taking them. Unfortunately, the fun of photography has to eventually give way to time at the keyboard.

Having some process of organization is essential. I have to be able to locate certain photos when they are asked for. And every person is different, so choose the method that best helps you. I always sort by date and separate my photos into their own folder, placing those of my husband and my daughter in separate folders. I have found that over time it is easy to forget who took what.

Watercolor Sky
January 2001

Watercolor Sky, Saddle Creek Park, Lakeland, Florida


Organization is again a factor when placing images online. I have noticed viewers like a general idea of what each grouping of photographs is about. As a collection, these groupings should have a consistent theme, whether that is the subject itself, the location, or some other influence. Decide in advance what you are trying to display and pick photographs that best display that topic. And choose a variety. There is nothing more boring than photos whose only difference is how you shifted your feet. Display your best.

Out Chasing The Sun
October 2007

Out Chasing The Sun, Lake Ariana, Auburndale, Florida


Don't be afraid to act like you know something. Now, I'm not talking about being a "photo snob". Being teachable, knowing you don't know everything, is crucial, both on the web and in person. I am learning something every day that will help me become a better photographer. Instead, I am talking about knowing what you did to get an image. Should someone ask you, be able to tell them what camera settings you used. Also, tell the viewer what the photo is of; do some research to discover what kind of bird or flower that is. I am less impressed with someone's work when they can give me no clue about the subject.

Most of all, know that creating a good portfolio, one that you are proud of, takes time. I take photos all year, a lot of which were just for myself. Most of the time only 3 or 4 of those ever makes it into what I consider my best work. It often takes many years to properly collect a good portfolio of images.

Florida Sunrise
April 2009


Florida Sunrise


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Suzanne Williams Photography
Florida, USA

Suzanne Williams is a native Floridian, wife, and mother, with a penchant for spelling anything, who happens to love photography.

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Series on Words

Words - Part Five


This is the final week in our WORDS series. So far, we’ve looked at words, original, ripples, and dynamite. The last word is seeds.

Words
Original
Ripples
Dynamite
Seeds

Seeds need to be Planted
We are all familiar with seeds and know they appear dry and dead as they lie in a packet. Words lying in a dictionary are much the same. It’s only as we form them into sentences, paragraphs and stories and plant them in people’s hearts and minds, that we see life. It is our choice whether those seeds are positive or negative.

Seeds need Warmth and Moisture
Written words need receptive minds and spirits to grow and take root. In Matthew 13:1-9, Jesus spoke about seeds being eaten by birds, and falling on rocky and thorny ground. He also spoke of seeds that fell on good soil, producing a hundred, sixty and thirty times what was sown. Some of our words will not have much effect but as we seek out readers who are open to our writing, our words will bear fruit.

Seeds take Time to Grow
Ecclesiastes 11:1,4 explains this in an easy to understand picture and also encourages us to keep sowing, even if conditions don’t look good.

1 Cast your bread upon the waters, for after many days you will find it again.
4 Whoever watches the wind will not plant; whoever looks at the clouds will not reap.


God watches over the words we write and will bring them to fruition in His time. Some may produce results quickly and others may take years.

Seeds Produce Flowers and Fruit
They can also produce weeds. Our aim should be to write words that will feed people’s minds and hearts and fill them with beauty. A seed is small and insignificant but over time, produces roots and stalks, flowers and fruit. The flowers are pleasant to look at and fruit sustains and energizes. The seeds we plant can be as simple as an encouraging word, a meaningful sentence, or a complete story or article. The important thing to remember is it takes time. If we start planting seeds today, we won’t have a field full of flowers and fruit tomorrow. It’s a process.

Original words, dynamite words, words making ripples, words growing as seeds in people’s lives. God has placed endless possibilities in our hands and we are privileged to write in His name. It doesn’t matter if it’s not for a Christian market. God can still use our words in amazing ways and bring hope and healing to a hurting world.

(Please leave a comment if you’d like to share how God has used your words to touch others – we’d love to hear from you)


Debbie Roome works as a freelance writer from her home in New Zealand. Read some of her work at Suite 101 , Take Root and Write and Faithwriters.

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Nothing but Trouble



This week, the

Christian Fiction Blog Alliance

is introducing

Nothing But Trouble

Tyndale House Publishers (May 1, 2009)

by

Susan May Warren




ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Susan grew up in Wayzata, a suburb of Minneapolis, and became an avid camper from an early age. Her favorite fir-lined spot is the north shore of Minnesota is where she met her husband, honeymooned and dreamed of living.

The north woods easily became the foundation for her first series, The Deep Haven series, based on a little tourist town along the shores of Lake Superior. Her first full-length book, Happily Ever After, became a Christy Award Finalist published in 2004 with Tyndale/Heartquest.

As an award winning author, Susan returned home in 2004, to her native Minnesota after serving for eight years with her husband and four children as missionaries with SEND International in Far East Russia. She now writes full time from Minnesota's north woods and the beautiful town that she always dreamed of living in.

You can sample a chapter of each and every one of Susan's novels, on her website, HERE.


ABOUT THE BOOK:

PJ Sugar knows three things for sure:

1) After traveling the country for ten years hoping to shake free from the trail of disaster that's become her life, she needs a fresh start.

2) The last person she wants to see when she heads home for her sister's wedding is Boone-her former flame and the reason she left town.

3) Her best friend's husband absolutely did not commit the first murder Kellogg, Minnesota, has seen in more than a decade.

What PJ doesn't know is that when she starts digging for evidence, she'll uncover much more than she bargained for-a deadly conspiracy, a knack for investigation, and maybe, just maybe, that fresh start she's been longing for.

It's not fair to say that trouble happens every time PJ Sugar is around, but it feels that way when she returns to her home town, looking for a fresh start. Within a week, her former teacher is murdered and her best friend's husband is arrested as the number-one suspect. Although the police detective investigating the murder—who also happens to be PJ's former flame—is convinced it's an open-and-shut case, PJ's not so sure. She begins digging for clues in an effort to clear her friend’s husband and ends up reigniting old passions, uncovering an international conspiracy, and solving a murder along the way. She also discovers that maybe God can use a woman who never seems to get it right.

If you would like to read the first chapter of Nothing But Trouble, go HERE.



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Monday, April 27, 2009

A Vote of Confidence Gets My Vote

Pixels - this is yet another great read!

I love American history, although my high school teachers and college professors would probably scoff at my comment. I learned to love history after I got out of school, and out of the textbooks, and discovered it on my own through biographies and fictionalized accounts of historical events. When I started to learn about the PEOPLE of history, rather than just the "boring" dates and causes, I began to absorb it and found a new passion.


Robin Lee Hatcher's A Vote of Confidence is a perfect example. She brings history alive through characters we grow to love, and settings so real you forget it's fiction. I found myself living back in time, cheering and crying as the story progressed. Wonderful book by a precious author.


Read more!





This week, the

Christian Fiction Blog Alliance

is introducing

A Vote Of Confidence

Zondervan (April 2009)

by

Robin Lee Hatcher



ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Robin Lee Hatcher discovered her vocation as a novelist after many years of reading everything she could put her hands on, including the backs of cereal boxes and ketchup bottles. The winner of the Christy Award for Excellence in Christian Fiction (Whispers from Yesterday), the RITA Award for Best Inspirational Romance (Patterns of Love and The Shepherd's Voice), two RT Career Achievement Awards (Americana Romance and Inspirational Fiction), and the RWA Lifetime Achievement Award, Robin is the author of over 50 novels, including Catching Katie, named one of the Best Books of 2004 by the Library Journal.

Robin enjoys being with her family, spending time in the beautiful Idaho outdoors, reading books that make her cry, and watching romantic movies. She is passionate about the theater, and several nights every summer, she can be found at the outdoor amphitheater of the Idaho Shakespeare Festival, enjoying Shakespeare under the stars. She makes her home outside of Boise, sharing it with Poppet the high-maintenance Papillon.


ABOUT THE BOOK:


In A Vote of Confidence, the stage is set for some intriguing insight into what it was like during 1915 to be a woman in a “mans’ world.”

Guinevere Arlington is a beautiful young woman determined to remain in charge of her own life, For seven years, Gwen has carved out a full life in the bustling town of Bethlehem Springs, Idaho, where she teaches piano and writes for the local newspaper. Her passion for the town, its people, and the surrounding land prompt Gwen to run for mayor. After all, who says a woman can’t do a man’s job?

But stepping outside the boundaries of convention can get messy. A shady lawyer backs Gwen, believing he can control her once she’s in office. A wealthy newcomer throws his hat into the ring in an effort to overcome opposition to the health resort he’s building north of town. When the opponents fall in love, everything changes, forcing Gwen to face what she may have to lose in order to win.

If you would like to read the first chapter of A Vote Of Confidence, go HERE.






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We Have a Winner - Let it Snow!

Our special guest judge, Virginia Smith, sent the following e-mail about our Snow Description Contest:

I'm so impressed with every one of these entries! Pixels are a talented group of writers. Mary, Ava, Pat, and Stephanie, thank you so much for entering the contest. I love the images each one of you created in my mind. You made me smile and ponder and feel nostalgic. Selecting a winner from among such creative pieces is nearly impossible, but I had to chose one. So I chose Ava Pennington's essay because it made me think of snow in a way I've never before considered.

Great job, all of you!

Congratulations, Ava!!

Since the entries were posted in the comments this time, I'll post Ava's winning entry here:

Snow

by Ava Pennington

A snowflake is a picture of a Christian...

Snowflakes are unique, yet appear to look alike.

Christians are unique individuals, but are in the process of looking like Christ.

Snowflakes cover dirty streets with a white blanket reflecting the sun's light.

Christians cover a multitude of sins when they share Christ's love.

Snowflakes are pure refreshment on the tip of the tongue.

Christians bring refreshment as they encourage the weary and faint-hearted.

Snowflakes are fragile alone, but together can shut down a city.

Christians are vulnerable alone, but together, the Body of Christ prevails against the gates of hell!

Be sure to visit Ava online to learn more about her writing.

Thanks, Ginny, for joining us again. Pixels, be sure to get a copy of Murder at Eagle Summit - you'll love it! Visit Ginny online to learn about, and order, her books.


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Friday, April 24, 2009

PUGS Pointer #21: Exclamations Make a Point!

PUGS* Pointers
(*Punctuation, Usage, Grammar, and Spelling)
by Kathy Ide

In this column, freelance author, editor, and speaker Kathy Ide shares tips on Punctuation, Usage, Grammar, and Spelling (“PUGS”).


PUNCTUATION TIP
Exclamations
Use a comma after exclamatory oh or ah if a slight pause is intended.
“Oh, what a frightening cover!” Marilyn said when she saw Jim Bell’s latest novel.
“Ah, how charming!” Rachel said when she finished Deb Raney’s sequel.

No comma after vocative O or Oh.
“O mighty king!” “Oh great warrior!”

“Oh yes,” “Oh yeah,” and “Ah yes” are written without a comma. When spoken like a single word, “Yes sir” and “No ma’am” may be written without a comma. If “sir” is used in direct address, use the comma.
“No, sir, I disagree.”

See The Chicago Manual of Style (15th edition) #6.27 and The Christian Writer’s Manual of Style page 153 and the Associated Press Stylebook (for articles) page 332.


USAGE TIP

breath/breathe
breath (always a noun) refers to the inhalation/exhalation of air.
“Tamara’s breath was frozen in the cold air.”
breath (noun) can also mean “a slight indication or suggestion.”
“The faintest breath of a scandal.”

breathe (always a verb) means “to inhale or exhale air.”
“If you breathe deeply you will feel better.”
breathe (verb) can also mean “to feel free of restraint.”
“Martha needed room to breathe.”
breathe (verb) can also mean “to permit passage of air.”
“This fabric really breathes.”
breathe (verb) can also mean “to utter or express.”
“Don’t breathe a word,” Kay begged.


GRAMMAR TIP

Opening with Pronouns
As a general rule, you don’t want to start a new chapter or section with a pronoun. If you open with “He pulled out a gun and aimed it at her head,” your reader will have no idea who these characters are. Chapter and section breaks often indicate a change in time, place, and/or point of view, so your reader cannot assume that the people referred to in the new chapter/section are the same ones talked about in the last one.

NOTE: If you’re writing a suspense novel, you may want to keep the identity of a character a mystery. This is tricky, but can be done if you know what you’re doing. If this is your goal, try using a first-person pronoun (I, me) for that character, or an ambiguous noun “the man” (or better yet, something more descriptive like “the handsome foreigner”) instead of just “he” or “she.”


SPELLING TIP

airmail (one word)



**********

PUGS Pointers are based on the current industry-standard references in the United States.

For books:
The Chicago Manual of Style (15th edition, © 2003)
Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary (11th edition, © 2003)

For articles:
The Associated Press Stylebook (© 2004)
Webster’s New World College Dictionary (© 2002)

Many publishing houses have their own in-house style guides that may differ in some aspects from the standard references. However, unless you’re writing exclusively for one particular publisher, it’s best to follow the standard references and let the in-house proofreaders adjust to house style.

For more PUGS Pointers, see Kathy Ide’s Web site: www.KathyIde.com. Or get her book Polishing the PUGS, available at www.kathyide.com/published.php.


AUTHOR BIO:


Kathy Ide has been writing for publication since 1988. She has written books, articles, play and movie scripts, short stories, devotionals, and curriculum. She is a full-time freelance editor, offering a full range of editorial services for aspiring writers, established authors, commercial book publishers, subsidy publishers, and magazines. Her services include proofreading, copyediting, substantive/content editing, coauthoring, ghostwriting, and mentoring/coaching. She also speaks at writers conferences across the country. She is the founder and coordinator of The Christian PEN: Proofreaders and Editors Network (www.TheChristianPEN.com) and the Christian Editor Network (www.ChristianEditor.com). To find out more, please visit www.KathyIde.com.



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Thursday, April 23, 2009

The Rules Still Apply

I have noticed by spending a lot of time in photography circles that there are 3 basic types of nature photographers. There are those who know everything there is about the engineering side of the camera. They can figure focal lengths in their head and talk in millimeters. It always seems to me like these are missing the "fun" of photography.

Then there are those who truly take amazing photographs. The exposure is spot on; the composition is effective. However, they have no idea what they took a photo of. You can always spot these types of photographers by their photo titles - "bee", "bird", etc. - or lack thereof.

The last type is the person who uses photography as a tool to study the subject matter. These are in direct opposition to the previous type. Their photos aren't so good, but they can give you all the scientific details about what type of bee or bird is in the picture, if it's a male or female, the age of the creature, and how rare the population is.

Mourning Dove

Mourning Dove


Man has a tendency to get in a rut. We all do it. We take a particular path, decide we like it, and camp out there. The engineer photographer can't seem to forget about his lens and just admire the scene. The visual photographer doesn't take the time to care about what they are photographing. The subject photographer won't get his mind off of the subject and learn to compose a better picture.

The truth is the rules of photography are still in effect no matter what type of photographer you are. You will still need the proper focal length, the right aperture, and the correct ISO for each scene. The rules of composition are still needed to give proper visual appeal to the viewer. And every photographer should know a little bit about what they are photographing. Show others you care about your subject matter.

Primrose Willow

Primrose Willow


It has been said many times how boring the world would be if we were all alike. I believe the world of photography needs pieces of all three types of photographers. People should see your personality, your style, when they view your work. But the end goal, no matter how you go about it, should always be to create a pleasing photograph.

Eastern Amberwing Dragonfly

Eastern Amberwing Dragonfly


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Suzanne Williams Photography
Florida, USA

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Kenyan Pastor/Evangelist Needs Help for Starving People

Author/editor Nancy Arant Williams is asking for help. She writes, "In the past several years I've been in contact with a dear Kenyan pastor/ evangelist, Pastor Gideon Mudenyo who has been traveling to conduct evangelistic crusades, where many, many souls have come to know Christ." [Nancy suggested doing an online search for his name to learn more about him. There are dozens of links, but here's one of the best Calvary Chapel. After you land on that page and read the letter, click the other Pastor Gideon link for more letters.]

"In the past year, Kenya has undergone a terrible civil war, famine and drought, which have especially targeted the poor. In March, Pastor Mudenyo asked for prayer for Kenya and for provision for believers there, as food, which is now very scarce, is so costly that they cannot afford it. Their current situation is desperate. Mothers are now reduced to feeding their children nothing but boiled water, and hoping they will not die of starvation. Right now a 30 lb. bag of corn costs $50, which will feed a family of six for two weeks.

"My heart breaks over their plight, and I would appreciate so much the prayerful help of believers who are willing to come alongside them. If you would like to make a donation of any size, please use Paypal and this email address: nancyarantwilliams[at]hughes[dot]net, and I will send it at my expense via Western Union, the only safe way to send money to war-torn areas of the world.

"Please also pray that what food they have God will multiply. Just as God kept (Elijah's) the widow of Zaraphath alive with meal and oil that didn't fail, and fed 5,000 with food to spare, He can make certain their bags of corn are never empty.

Thanks so much for whatever you can do."

Nancy

UPDATE: Since Nancy sent this information to us, she received word from Pastor Mudenyo that the latest food supplies have run out. So our help is desperately needed ASAP. Can you help? Any amount is appreciated.

And please, help spread the word.

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Word Series

Words – Part Four
Welcome to part four of our series on words. We’ve already examined the meaning of words, original and ripples and today we’re looking at dynamite.

Words
Original
Ripples
Dynamite
S

Words are Extremely Powerful
I think we all know that. We are affected by words that are spoken to us, or about us, and they can cause us to make life-altering decisions. Written words are just as powerful. Think of a book that caused a shift in your thinking, or a nasty note from someone who held a grudge against you. Those words had an effect on your mind and emotions.

Words can Build up and Break down
Words are like sticks of dynamite. They have the power to start wars, destroy self esteem, blow apart friendships and destroy families. On a positive note, they can also heal hurts, educate, bring truth, affirm, validate and protect. If you take a stick of dynamite and throw it into a busy street, the results will be devastating. A controlled blast is the correct way to use an explosive and we see this with words. Just as toppling old structures can make way for progress, carefully targeted writing can bring about positive change and growth.

Where can we use powerful Words
As writers, we can use our words to take a stand against immorality and ungodly behavior in our society. Write letters to businesses that use offensive advertising and encourage friends to do the same. A billboard appeared in our city last year, featuring a prostitute with a piece of material as a skirt. When the wind blew, the material lifted, showing her skimpy underwear. I wrote to the local authorities, the newspaper and the New Zealand Advertising Standards Authority, as did a number of other people. We lost our appeal ... but the billboard was removed within a week. Our words did not fall on deaf ears.

Knowing when to use Strong Words
The right words at the wrong time can be just as devastating as the wrong words at the right time. Consider the situation and timing carefully and let love be your motivation. I have found this passage from Ecclesiastes 3:1-8 (NIV) to be helpful:

1 There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under heaven:
2 a time to be born and a time to die, a time to plant and a time to uproot,
3 a time to kill and a time to heal, a time to tear down and a time to build,
4 a time to weep and a time to laugh, a time to mourn and a time to dance,
5 a time to scatter stones and a time to gather them, a time to embrace and a time to refrain,
6 a time to search and a time to give up, a time to keep and a time to throw away,
7 a time to tear and a time to mend, a time to be silent and a time to speak,
8 a time to love and a time to hate, a time for war and a time for peace.

My prayer is that God will show me the right time to use strong words; that I will write them when He wants me to. We can make a difference and as more and more people stand up for righteousness, our words will become more and more effective. My final thought for this week is a quote from Edmund Burke: “The only thing needed for evil to prosper, is for good men to do nothing.”

Come back next Wednesday to find out what the S stands for – the last letter in our WORDS series.


Debbie Roome works as a freelance writer from her home in New Zealand. Read some of her work at Suite 101 , Take Root and Write and Faithwriters.



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Monday, April 20, 2009

Contest - Win Murder at Eagle Summit!

Virginia Smith's latest mystery - one of her most suspenseful yet - is on store shelves this month. Our local Walmart only had two copies of Murder at Eagle Summit left the first week of the month, so hurry to get yours soon! You can also order from Amazon, CBD, and Barnes & Noble.

Ginny's giving away an autographed copy to one creative Pixel in a fun, new contest. But you have to work for it. :-)

In 100 words or less, in the comments section below, give us a description of SNOW. Ginny says, "The judging will be completely subjective --whichever one appeals to me the most. The appeal might be the beauty of the words. It might be the feeling the description evokes. It might be the vividness of the picture the description paints in my mind."

Leave your 100-words-or-less description of SNOW by Friday, April 24th, for your chance to win Murder at Eagle Summit.

About the book:



The classical trio from A Taste of Murder head west, to play at a wedding in Park City, Utah. A romantic ski resort seems the perfect place for a wedding. Until a murder on the slopes turns everyone on Eagle Summit into suspects. Liz Carmichael, the bride's cousin, saw a shadowy figure on a chair lift in the middle of the night. But was it the victim or the killer? Liz goes to the police -- and finds herself giving her report to her ex-fiance, Deputy Tim Richards. After a three-year estrangement, she could finally make things right with Tim. Unless the killer finds her first.



About the author:



Virginia Smith left her job as a corporate director to become a full time writer and speaker with the release of her first novel Just As I Am. Since then she has contracted ten novels and published numerous articles and short stories.



She writes contemporary humorous novels for the Christian market, including Murder by Mushroom, Stuck in the Middle, and her newest releases, A Taste of Murder and Age before Beauty.



In March of 2008 she was named "Writer of the Year" at Mount Hermon Christian Writers Conference. An energetic speaker, Virginia loves to exemplify God's truth by comparing real-life situations to well-known works of fiction, such as her popular talk, "Biblical Truths in Star Trek."

You can learn more about Ginny and view all her books on her Web site.


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Reluctant Cowgirl - GREAT READ!

I loved this week's feature book, Reluctant Cowgirl. Real characters, fresh setting, and enough twists and turns to keep me turning pages quickly. Sweet read.







This week, the

Christian Fiction Blog Alliance

is introducing

Reluctant Cowgirl

Barbour Publishing (April 2009)

by

Christine Lynxwiler


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Christine lives with her husband and two precious daughters in the foothills of the beautiful Ozark Mountains in her home state of Arkansas. Her greatest earthly joy is her family and, aside from doing God’s will, spending time with them is her top priority.

She recently took a break from writing romance to pen a Christmas story with a twist. Her Mom Lit novella, My True Love Gave to Me, is part of a 2 in 1 anthology from Barbour entitled All Jingled Out. It’s also included in Simply Christmas, a 4 in 1 Barbour anthology. One of my holiday highlights was seeing Simply Christmas at Sam’s Club a few weeks before Christmas.

She has written two other novellas, both romance, which are included in Barbour anthologies, City Dreams, and Prairie County Fair and a serial for the Heartsong Presents book club newsletter – The Carousel Horse. The Carousel Horse can be read in its entirety on the Heartsong website, and you can read excerpts from all of her other books on her website, HERE.

In 2003, Christine was honored by being voted #2 Favorite New Author by the Heartsong Presents Book Club members!

ABOUT THE BOOK:

Actress Crytal McCord gave up the closeness of her big family in order to make a name for herself on the New York City stage. But when life in the Big Apple turns sour, she follows a country road back to her parents Arkansas ranch.The last thing she expects to find in cowboy country is a new leading man. Still, she can't help but imagine handsome rancher Jeremy Buchanan in the role. Unfortunately, Jeremy's been burned by Crystal's type before. Or has he? Every time he thinks he knows her, the multi-faceted woman surprises him. Will the reluctant pair allow their hearts to guide them, or will their common stubborn pride keep them miles apart?




To read the first chapter of Reluctant Cowgirl, click HERE.









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Friday, April 17, 2009

PUGS Pointers #20: Compound Predicates

PUGS* Pointers
(*Punctuation, Usage, Grammar, and Spelling)
by Kathy Ide

In this column, freelance author, editor, and speaker Kathy Ide shares tips on Punctuation, Usage, Grammar, and Spelling (“PUGS”).


PUNCTUATION TIP
Compound Predicates
A comma should not be used between the parts of a “compound predicate” (two or more verbs having the same subject).
“Kate took Gail to a writers conference and talked her into signing up for two more.”

See The Chicago Manual of Style (15th edition) #6.34 and The Christian Writer’s Manual of Style page 150.


USAGE TIP

capital/capitol
capital (noun) can mean “wealth/accumulated possessions,” “a column,” or “a city serving as a seat of government.”

capital (adjective) means “punishable by death,” “chief in importance or influence,” “excellent,” or “not lowercased.”
“the capital importance of criticism”
“a capital book”
“spelled with a capital M”

A capitol is a building, or group of buildings, in which the functions of state government are carried out. (When capitalized, it refers to the building in which the United States Congress meets at Washington.)
“Capitol Hill” refers to the legislative branch of the United States government.


GRAMMAR TIP
Make sure that every pronoun in your manuscript has an antecedent. Example:
Amanda said she was going to the store. (She refers to Amanda.)

Exception: The pronouns it and who sometimes stand alone.
“It’s a beautiful day” or “It’s going to rain.”
“Who was at the door?”

Caution: Avoid using the stand-alone it as much as possible.


SPELLING TIP
air-condition (verb)
air conditioner (noun—no hyphen)
air-conditioning (noun)
air-conditioned (adjective)


**********

PUGS Pointers are based on the current industry-standard references in the United States.

For books:
The Chicago Manual of Style (15th edition, © 2003)
Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary (11th edition, © 2003)

For articles:
The Associated Press Stylebook (© 2004)
Webster’s New World College Dictionary (© 2002)

Many publishing houses have their own in-house style guides that may differ in some aspects from the standard references. However, unless you’re writing exclusively for one particular publisher, it’s best to follow the standard references and let the in-house proofreaders adjust to house style.

For more PUGS Pointers, see Kathy Ide’s Web site: www.KathyIde.com. Or get her book Polishing the PUGS, available at www.kathyide.com/published.php.


AUTHOR BIO:


Kathy Ide has been writing for publication since 1988. She has written books, articles, play and movie scripts, short stories, devotionals, and curriculum. She is a full-time freelance editor, offering a full range of editorial services for aspiring writers, established authors, commercial book publishers, subsidy publishers, and magazines. Her services include proofreading, copyediting, substantive/content editing, coauthoring, ghostwriting, and mentoring/coaching. She also speaks at writers conferences across the country. She is the founder and coordinator of The Christian PEN: Proofreaders and Editors Network (www.TheChristianPEN.com) and the Christian Editor Network (www.ChristianEditor.com). To find out more, please visit www.KathyIde.com.



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Thursday, April 16, 2009

An Hour Chasing Butterflies

There are days that I write this blog and find the words for my thoughts easy to formulate. On other days, like today, I am bereft of exactly how to express what it is I am thinking. I don't know if that constitutes writer's block or not, but I comfort myself with the knowledge that I am, after all, more a photographer than a writer.

Well, this afternoon as I contemplated what to write, I realized I had a banger of a headache. I began getting headaches years ago when I had to stare at a computer screen all day and have learned with practice that the best cure is time resting my eyes. So today I decided to sit on my front stoop, stare at the flowers, and take in some fresh air. Fresh air and flowers would seem to be a good solution.

Skipper


As I sat there, watching the busy activity of a multifarious collection of bees - tiny, fly-size bees; green, metallic bees; large, loud bumblebees - a butterfly intruded into the scene. Before I knew it there was another and another.

I have noticed that inspiriation tends to strike me at unexpected moments. I am most often doing something else unrelated. Today's headache is a great example. I was out there to rest my eyes, clear my head, and rid myself of the throbbing in my skull. But it was as if the butterflies knew it and chose that moment to present themselves.

Zebra Swallowtail on Lantana


I simply cannot resist photographing a butterfly. I think it is the challenge of capturing them just at the right angle, at the right moment in time. (Digital is great for butterfly photography because I always have more "bad" shots than "good" ones where insects are concerned.)

And it speaks again to my love for all things that fly and crawl amongst the petals.

Duskywing


Before I knew it, I had spent a most enjoyable hour chasing butterflies, and I had forgotten all about my headache. At least, I forgot about it until I had to write this blog again tonight! (Love you, Tracy!)

I hope in the end you enjoy the photos anyway. I am much better at those!

Hairstreak


Many thanks to the butterflies for showing up. :)


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Suzanne Williams Photography
Florida, USA

Suzanne Williams is a native Floridian, wife, and mother, with a penchant for spelling anything, who happens to love photography.

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Contest - Win Prize Pack of Books! Act Fast!

Sorry for the interruption this week - be sure to check out Debbie's great series on Words below this post.

Big Contest, Pixels! But you have to act fast, and leave a comment relevant to this post below by THIS FRIDAY, APRIL 17th. If Pix-N-Pens has the most comments of the blogs on this tour, we'll hold a drawing for an awesome prize pack of the following books:


A Grace Disguised by Jerry Sittser

A Woman's Guide to Overcoming Depression by Archibald Hart, Ph.D. and
Catherine Hart Weber, Ph. D.

Rest: Living in Sabbath Simplicity by Keri Wyatt Kent

Dragonlight, a novel by Donita K. Paul

Blue Heart Blessed, a novel by Susan Meissner

Taking a Stand by Janet Lynn Mitchell

And Kathi Macias's own books:

Beyond Me: Living a You-First Life in a Me-First World

The Train-of-Thought Writing Method: Practical, User-Friendly Help for
Beginning Writers

Emma Jean Reborn, a novel

Sally Stuart's 2009 Christian Writers Market Guide


Kathi's book How Can I Run a Tight Ship When I'm Surrounded by Loose Cannons is wonderful. I laughed and cried as I read it - and even wanted more when the book ended. It reminded me a great deal of Erma Bombeck, so if you liked her work, you'll love Kathi's too!

Read more about the book, and about the precious author I'm honored to call friend, then leave a comment, relevant to this post, below for your chance to win! Be sure to tell your friends too - because the more we have leaving comments the better your chances! All comments must be made by FRIDAY, April 17th.


About the Book:


(Homeland, CA) - For all the Christian women in the world who dread reading Proverbs 31 and wonder who on earth could ever live up to that woman - this book is for you. Between dirty diapers, complaining children, housework, husbands and a multitude of other attention-grabbing detours women face, award-winning author and speaker, Kathi Macias finds a way to encourage and biblically instruct women of all ages and phases. Women everywhere are the glue that holds their families together. Keeping everything under control challenges even the most organized household CEO. Kathi uses humor, God's Word, as well as practical insight and instruction to lovingly encourage women to grow in this progression of grace.

Readers will find How Can I Run a Tight Ship When I'm Surrounded by Loose Cannons?: Proverbs 31 Discoveries for Yielding to the Master of the Seas, filled with scriptural explanations and journaling pages to process and write their personal feelings and prayers. With sections of the book focused on each step of the learning process to guide our ships to safe harbor, readers will be happily surprised to find the funny without the fluff. Kathi's words are the "spoonful of sugar that makes the medicine go down." Her vulnerable approach facilitates the teachings of Proverbs 31, making it easier for women to swallow. The truth of the scriptures is very much alive and well throughout the pages, yet the ease and charm of the author's words entice readers to press forward and embrace the plan for God's woman today.

About the Author:

Kathi Macias is a multi-award winning writer who has authored 26 books and ghostwritten several others. A former newspaper columnist and string reporter, Kathi has taught creative and business writing in various venues and has been a guest on many radio and television programs. Kathi is a popular speaker at churches, women's clubs and retreats, and writers' conferences. She recently won the prestigious 2008 member of the year award from AWSA (Advanced Writers and Speakers Association) at the annual Golden Scrolls award banquet. Kathi "Easy Writer" Macias lives in Homeland, CA, with her husband, Al, where the two of them spend free time riding their Harley.




Blog Tour Interview:

I understand you sometimes refer to this book as "discipleship with a grin." What do you mean by that, and why did you choose a humor format for a discipleship book?

Actually, I chose a discipleship theme for a humor title. As much as I hate to admit it, the title came to me one day and I knew I had to do something with it--just too good to pass up! So the more I thought/prayed about it, the more I realized it described my life, both naturally and spiritually. I began to try to lay out my spiritual growth via humorous life stories, and found they produced a natural pattern. From there I developed the five stages of spiritual growth into five sections for the book, and I was off and running! Besides, I learned from a friend/mentor years ago that you can "shove a lot of truth down people's throat when their mouth is open laughing," so I figured, why not???


What are some of the funniest "loose cannons" stories included in your book?

One of my favorites is the story of my very first women's retreat as a brand new Christian back in the "Jesus freak" days of baptisms at the beach and praise-ins at the park. I shared a room with three ladies I had never met, one of whom ended up being my "bunk mate." She snored, she was quite a bit overweight (taking up much more than her side of the bed!), and she "leaked" because she was still weaning her youngest child. You'll have to read the story to see how that experience taught me a lot about "spiritual face plants."

Another favorite story is about the time I took my three sons (two pre-teens and one elementary school age at the time) to the community swimming pool. The older boys decided to use their younger brother as a human beach ball, and when they ignored my cries from the side of the pool to stop, I actually had the nerve to jump into the water and swim right up to them and order them to stop. Their level of humiliation at being seen in the pool with their mother was as close to social suicide as it gets. But we all survived and learned a lot in the process.
Your book is divided into five sections. Can you briefly explain what they are and what they have to do with discipleship and humor?

As I mentioned earlier, the five sections correspond with what I consider the five stages of spiritual growth: crawling (infants or "rugrats") on our knees; walking (toddlers who are still a bit shaky but exploring and learning); running (stronger, more mature believers who are beginning to make a difference in their world); flying or soaring (eagles with a solid foundation and maturity to share with others); resting (back on our knees and realizing that place of utter dependence on Him is really the best place to be after all). The discipleship correlation is, I believe, evident in these stages; the humor comes in simply because I'm one of those slow learners who needs God to "hit me upside the head" at times, and I haven't been bashful about explaining those times in the book.

What advice can you give to the young mom out there who is juggling two kids, a fulltime job outside the home, a husband, housework, pets and church?

Life happens in seasons! You CAN'T be all things to all people at all times. It simply doesn't work. And if you don't believe it, read about my many crash-and-burn episodes as I tried! The Proverbs 31 woman is a composite picture of many women from different walks and stages of life; when we get a grip on that, it releases us to enjoy the season we're in right now, even as we prepare for the next one.

How did raising your own children help prepare you for the parenting side of the proverbial woman? Any tips you'd like to share?

Relax and enjoy them! Yes, even the rugrats and teenagers, because "this too shall pass." There were times I thought I'd go bald from pulling out my own hair over the frustrations and failures of that season of my life, but now it's my grandchildren who are passing through those rugrat-to-teen stages, and hey, I still have my hair! You'll make it--and so will your kids--in spite of your frustrations and failures. And yes, I know there are too many of those to mention (or admit to). I'm the queen of mom-failures, and yet my kids never cease to bless me with words of love and praise. Do I deserve it? Probably not. But I love every minute of it!

Do you have a favorite part of the book or a favorite chapter?

Several, in fact, but one in particular: Chapter 26, "Back Home Again," contains the story of my precious father, a man who lived for 88 years denying God's existence and then finally turning to him in his last week of life. It's one of the more serious stories in the book, but even that one ends on a humorous note.

If the Proverbs 31 woman is alive today, what does she look like?

She looks like me--and you--and every woman whose heart longs to please God and to raise her children according to the Scriptures, even though she knows she's doing well just to make sure they all have their sack lunches before they leave for school in the morning. She's thin, overweight, short, tall, black, white, brown, red, yellow, and polka dot when she catches her kids' chicken pox. And she's absolutely beautiful!!!

Are there some specific lessons you hope readers will learn and apply to their lives after reading your book?

I want them to learn to relax and laugh and enjoy this voyage called "life," and to trust the Captain of our souls to take us home safely when our trip is over, rather than struggling to "man the oars" ourselves.

What makes your book different than other books similar to yours that are in circulation today?

There are countless books written for "control freak" women who want to do it all and be it all--perfectly and completely at all times. This one, however, is not only written with a humorous tone, but it also takes the reader through what I call the five steps of spiritual growth: crawling, walking, running, flying--and back on our knees, totally dependent once again. I do this by exposing many of the sometimes humorous--and sometimes not so humorous--events in my own life as I progressed through the five stages.

Are there any authors that either influenced you personally or influenced your style of writing? Who are they and how did they influence you?

Brennan Manning, Henri J. M. Nouwen, and Max Lucado have to be right at the top of my favorite nonfiction authors list, simply because they call me back to the heart of worship, to a fresh appreciation of grace and a clarion call to rely totally upon God and not myself. I need those reminders on a regular basis. In addition, I love their writing styles. Their words "sing," and it is my goal to do the same with the words I write.

When you are not writing, what do you like to do? Do you have any hobbies?

Okay, now I have to 'fess up to how nearly one-dimensional I am. If I'm not writing, I'm...well, reading someone else's writing. That's at the top of my "what I like to do" list. However, I also spend time riding on the back of my husband's 2003 Harley Davidson Road King motorcycle. He's been riding HD's since 1970 and says he will never outgrow that youthful passion. On the road we are known as "Big Al" and "Easy Writer..."

Be sure to check out Kathi's blog, too!





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Series on Words

Words - Part Three


Welcome to part three of our series on words. So far we’ve looked at words and original. This week, our word is ripples.

Words
Original
Ripples
D
S

What is a Ripple
Most of us have made ripples by throwing pebbles into a pond or lake. It works best when the water is calm and you can see the circles spreading out, further and further. We can create the same effect by putting our writing out into the world. If just one person reads it and acts on it, we have created a ripple.

How can I start a Ripple
There are many ways. First of all, write something that you feel strongly about and then find a home for it. If you’re just starting out, offer it to your church for their weekly bulletin or send it to a local newspaper in the form of a letter. Blogging is another outlet as are websites that invite you to submit content. Even a simple card to a friend can set off a ripple. Make a choice to be proactive and send out positive ripples as often as you can.

How far can a Ripple Reach
The bigger the pebble, the greater the distance the ripple will travel. Realistically, don’t expect to throw boulders when starting out. Just be faithful with what you can do, and in due time, the increase will come. Although you’re bound to get some feedback along the way, don’t forget the world is a big place and you’ll probably never know how far your words reach.

Ripples set off Ripples
This is an example from my own life. In August 2007, I read a post I on the Faithwriter’s message boards, written by Lynda Schab. She invited people to pop over to Pixnpens to enter a writing competition. Through Lynda posting a simple two line message, she set off a ripple in my life that ultimately led to me writing this column. (Thanks Lynda!) Not only that, I entered several competitions on Pixnpens and won a variety of books. One of those books inspired me to write an article entitled Physical Changes before Death. I submitted it to Suite101 in June 2008 and it is still averaging 600 reads per week. You’re welcome to have a look at it and read the comments about how it has touched people’s lives. The ripples keep going ...

Creating ripples is basically writing with a purpose in mind. How can I bless people with my words? How can I bring about change and improvement? How can I stand up for what is right and good? Answer these questions through your writing and ripples will flow from your pen and keyboard to untold numbers of people.

Have fun creating ripples and come back next Wednesday and find out what the D stands for.



Debbie Roome works as a freelance writer from her home in New Zealand. Read some of her work at Suite 101 , Take Root and Write and Faithwriters.




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Monday, April 13, 2009

The Secret Holocaust Diaries - The Untold Story of Nonna Bannister


Nonna Bannister appeared to be a typical American housewife. She married Henry, the love of her life, in 1951 and together they raised three children in Memphis, Tennessee. But Nonna was far from average. For half a century, she kept her story secret while living a normal life. She locked all of her photos, documents, diaries, and dark memories from World War II in a trunk in her attic.

Tyndale House Publishers announces the publication of The Secret Holocaust Diaries: The Untold Story of Nonna Bannister written by Nonna Bannister with Denise George and Carolyn Tomlin (April 2009, Tyndale House), the haunting eyewitness account of Nonna Lisowskaja Bannister, a remarkable Russian girl who saw and survived unspeakable evils during World War II.


The Secret Holocaust Diaries is written by Nonna although she passed away in 2004. Did she write the book before she died?

Yes, she slipped up into the attic each night, translated her diaries (from several different languages), and recorded them in English onto yellow legal pads. Much later, after she told her husband, Henry, about her incredible past, she showed him the stacks of yellow legal pads on which she had translated her diaries and recorded her thoughts about her past, and he typed them up into a manuscript.


Would Nonna have liked to see her book published before she died?

Nonna translated her diary into English and her husband, Henry, typed the manuscript. However, she requested the diary not be published until at least 2 or 3 years after she died. Henry honored this request. (She died in 2004.) The story was very painful and reminded her of the suffering her family endured. When she came to America in 1950 she was overwhelmed by her new life. She was determined to make a new life for herself and to give her husband and children a happy home.


Nonna came from a privileged family. Are there any interesting stories of people her ancestors knew?

Nonna's family "ran with" the upper crust in the Ukraine and Russia. Her mother and father were educated in Russia's great cultural city, St. Petersburg. Nonna's grandmother and grandfather knew the last Tsar, Nicholas II, and Nonna kept a postcard sent by him (shortly before his death) to her grandfather, Jakob, for his birthday (dated 1913?). Jakob was killed during the Revolution while trying to help Russian families escape.

Nonna writes in her diary of living on the ”Chekov Lane” in Taganrog, the street where Russian writer Anton Chekov (1860–1904) had once lived.
The family also visited often the boy Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (nicknamed "Sasha") and his mother, Taissia. She and Nonna’s mother, Anna, were good friends. They enjoyed giving concerts and playing the violin and piano. Nonna writes of eating ice cream with her mother and Taissia, and spending the night in the Solzhenitsyn home during a thunderstorm. Alexander was older that Nonna, studying at the university.


Many people assume most of the people killed by the Nazis were Jewish. Was Nonna’s family Jewish?

Although it is estimated that approximately 6 million Jews were killed by the Nazis, other nationalities experienced suffering and death, also. Nonna's family was Russian and owned seven grain mills and homes in southern Russia and the Ukraine. Her father, Yevgeny, and his family were from Warsaw, Poland, which included a large population of Jews. Due to border restrictions, Nonna never met her father's family. Yevgeny never told Nonna and her brother, Anatoly, if his family was Jewish. If the children didn't know, they could not let it slip. The admission of being Jewish could have meant deportation or certain death. There is speculation, but no one is certain.


Nonna saved many documents from her time at Nazi camps; what are these artifacts?

In a small ticking pillow she kept tied around her waist, she kept many one inch square photos of her family and friends in the Ukraine. She also kept her small childhood diary. On tiny slips of paper, she wrote her experiences (in diary form) and also kept these in the little pillow.Later she kept all these in a small trunk, which she painted bright green.


When Nonna finally revealed her secret, was her family shocked?

Henry knew there was something about her past that she didn’t want to talk about. Being a patient man, he never pressed her to speak about this secret. As they grew older, he asked her to write down some things about her family—so their children would know their heritage. After months of secretly translating her diary (written in several different languages) she took him to the attic, open the little green trunk and showed him her family’s photos and the yellow legal pages of the translated diary. Henry was astonished at what he saw.


What can people of Christian faith or Jewish faith/descent take from The Secret Holocaust Diaries?

That grave injustice exists--Nonna learned that from the Red Army (who killed many of her family members) and Hitler's army (who also killed many of her family members and imprisoned her in a labor camp). But that God's love and forgiveness for those who hurt us are stronger than even Hitler's evil and injustice. Nonna came out of the whole experience with her heart still filled with love. She experienced none of the bitterness and hatred that some Jewish Holocaust survivors have held onto. She was able to marry, raise children, and bring them much joy and happiness through her own love and through introducing them to God's love.




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Friday, April 10, 2009

PUGS Pointers #19: Commas with Cities and States

PUGS* Pointers
(*Punctuation, Usage, Grammar, and Spelling)
by Kathy Ide

In this column, freelance author, editor, and speaker Kathy Ide shares tips on Punctuation, Usage, Grammar, and Spelling (“PUGS”).


PUNCTUATION TIP

Commas with Cities and States

States, when spelled out or when the older abbreviation format is used, are enclosed in commas following the name of a city. Commas may be omitted with the newer (two capital letters) format.

Example: “Zondervan is in Grand Rapids, Mich., and Moody is based in Chicago, Illinois, but Karen has lived in Bedford CT for years.”

See The Chicago Manual of Style (15th edition) #15.31 and Associated Press Stylebook p. 235.


USAGE TIP

back up/backup
back up (verb) means “to move into a position behind” or “to make a copy of.”
“Don’t back up,” the waitress said, balancing the tray of food.
“I back up my computer files every day.”

backup (noun) means “a copy of computer data.”
“I make a backup of my computer files every day.”
backup (adjective) means “serving as a substitute or support.”
“Wendy decided she needed a backup plan.”


GRAMMAR TIP

Generations of English teachers have taught students certain rules that are either personal preferences or rules that have changed over time. For example:

Never use the word hopefully in place of “It is hoped” or “I/we hope.”
Many writers have been upbraided in recent years for using what is sometimes considered the colloquial usage of this word. The argument is that hopefully means “in a hopeful manner.” Therefore, a sentence like “Hopefully this will clear things up” could only mean “This will clear things up in a hopeful manner.”

However, according to the latest edition of Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, hopefully has two meanings. #1 is “in a hopeful manner.” #2 is “It is hoped; I hope; we hope.” The example given is “Hopefully the rain will end soon.”

Webster’s further explains that this second definition of hopefully is in a class of adverbs known as disjuncts. Disjuncts are a way for the author (or speaker) to comment directly to the reader (or hearer) based on the content of the sentence. Many other adverbs (interestingly, frankly, clearly, luckily, unfortunately) are similarly used. Webster’s states that the second definition of hopefully is “entirely standard.”


SPELLING TIP

lightening/lightning
lightening (verb) means “becoming lighter,” “illuminating, shining, brightening,” “making something brighter,” or “reducing in weight or quantity.” Examples:
“The acceptance went a long way toward lightening Veronica’s mood.”
“Sybil’s boss refused to consider lightening her duties after the accident.”

lightning (noun/adjective) refers to the flash of light in the sky that usually accompanies thunder.
“The lightning bolt lit up the night sky for an instant.”


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PUGS Pointers are based on the current industry-standard references in the United States.

For books:
The Chicago Manual of Style (15th edition, © 2003)
Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary (11th edition, © 2003)

For articles:
The Associated Press Stylebook (© 2004)
Webster’s New World College Dictionary (© 2002)

Many publishing houses have their own in-house style guides that may differ in some aspects from the standard references. However, unless you’re writing exclusively for one particular publisher, it’s best to follow the standard references and let the in-house proofreaders adjust to house style.

For more PUGS Pointers, see Kathy Ide’s Web site. Or get her book Polishing the PUGS, available here.


AUTHOR BIO:


Kathy Ide has been writing for publication since 1988. She has written books, articles, play and movie scripts, short stories, devotionals, and curriculum. She is a full-time freelance editor, offering a full range of editorial services for aspiring writers, established authors, commercial book publishers, subsidy publishers, and magazines. Her services include proofreading, copyediting, substantive/content editing, coauthoring, ghostwriting, and mentoring/coaching. She also speaks at writers conferences across the country. She is the founder and coordinator of The Christian PEN: Proofreaders and Editors Network and the Christian Editor Network. To find out more, please visit Kathy's Web site.



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Thursday, April 9, 2009

Easter Thoughts

When I was a child, Easter was a happy holiday full of multicolored pastel dresses, ribbons and bows, and decorative eggs. We'd gather after church at my grandmother's house just down the lane with all those aunts, uncles, and cousins who I only saw once or twice a year. There'd be plates of baked ham, tender green beans, 7-layer salad, and an abundance of other delicious foods. You ate until you popped and then it was...whisk...outdoors for the big Easter egg hunt.

Ah, memories...

Me
family 10=EDIT


As I have gotten older, the customs have changed. Some Easters my family hasn't gotten together at all. When my daughter was small, we'd go outdoors, just the 3 of us, and hide eggs underneath the palm trees and tropical plants. She enjoyed it just the same.

Easter is all of those childhood things. I have no problems with bunny rabbits, baby chicks, or chocolate candy. But at the heart of this holiday, I must step back and remember He who died for me. He who rose again. I challenge you to take a few minutes this Sunday to do the same.


Gladiolus


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Isaiah 53:2-6
Ronald Knox Version


He will watch this servant of his appear among us,
unregarded as brushwood shoot,
as a plant in waterless soil;
no stateliness here, no majesty, no beauty
as we gaze upon him, to win our hearts.

Nay, here is one despised,
left out of all human reckoning;
bowed with misery,
and no stranger to weakness;
how should we recognize that face?
How should we take any account of him, a man so despised?

Our weakness and it was he who carried the weight of it,
our miseries, and it was he who bore them.
A leper, so we thought of him,
a man God had smitten and brought low;
and all the while it was for our sins he was wounded,
it was guilt of ours crushed him down;
on him the punishment fell that brought us peace,
by his bruises we were healed.

Strayed sheep all of us, each following his own path;
and God laid on his shoulders our guilt,
the guilt of us all.


Behind the Petals


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Suzanne Williams Photography
Florida, USA

Suzanne Williams is a native Floridian, wife, and mother, with a penchant for spelling anything, who happens to love photography.